Kilo Tango Victor

October 1984. After several weeks of anticipation, that morning found me at the parking lots of Jandakot Airport outside Perth, Western Australia.

WIth Ford Telstar at Jandakot Airport, Perth.

I was in my final year at U.W.A., and my Control Systems lecturer Dr John Mills had offered his students free rides in his Cessna airplane. Jandakot,  a small-aircraft airport, was quite a distance away from Nedlands, the Perth suburb where I stayed. So I rented a car. A new Ford Telstar.

The aircraft, a Cessna 172 Skyhawk, was a propeller-driven single-engine four-seat plane. It was painted white with green and gold stripes along the fuselage. Green and Gold are the national colors of Australia. Patriotic without being overly loud. I liked it. And the registration number was VH-KTV. Sitting behind Dr Mills, I could clearly hear he talking with the tower – “…. Kilo Tango Victor…”

Since there were several of us the students, we had to take turns. It was a very welcome outing. For several hours we could forget that the finals were creeping nearer and nearer…

Kilo Tango Victor at Jandakot. Year 1999 picture from airliners.net

VH-KTV on the move at Jandakot. Year 2000 picture at airliners.net

Taxiing to the runway for take-off. October 1984.

Just after lifting off the runway at Jandakot.

From my back seat on the Cessna I could see the runway receding away after takeoff. Look carefully and we can see VH-KTV on the spine atop the fuselage towards the tail. Nowadays, in a commercial airliner, if I sit at the back, all I could see are the galleys and the toilets 🙂

Dr John Mills, left, in the pilot seat of his Cessna 172 Skyhawk VH-KTV. This was 1984, and the controls were all analog meters. The Cessna Skyhawk plane is very popular, even now it is still in production. Over 43,000 units has been produced since 1955. The current versions uses more advanced avionics, i.e. all digital LCD and stuff.

Rockingham and Garden Island, in the Indian Ocean south of Perth.

Lakes south of Perth. The city is barely visible at the top rightof this picture.

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2 Comments »

 
  • Bruce says:

    I was surprised to find the image here of Dr John Mills. He was my father. He died a couple of years ago. But – now I have a picture of him and a perspective from outside the family. BTW – you must have been doing EE about the same time as I was.

  • nordin says:

    Bruce, I’m very happy to receive word from Dr John Mills’ family. And at the same time I’m saddened to hear of his passing. When exactly did he pass away, if I may ask ?

    Dr Mills was my Control Systems lecturer as well as my final year project supervisor. He was a kind man, and was very patient with me while I stumbled learning on my own a Zilog processor assembly language, before I could start the project proper, writing a control program for a photocopy machine.

    The picture on this blog was one of two I took from the back seat of Dr Mills’ Cessna. The other picture showed Dr Mills looking more intently at the aircraft’s instrumentation. I’d be very happy to email you high resolution scans of both pictures.

    My first year at UWA was 1980. In 1981 the second year, my marks were not sufficient to proceed to third year. So I was left behind to redo second year. My final 4th year EE at UWA was 1984. I left Perth to return to Malaysia end January 1985.

    Did you do EE at UWA as well? If so we must have crossed paths.

 

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